Drumstick Leaves Upkari (Moringa leaves stir-fry Mangalorean Style)

Drumstick Leaves Upkari (Moringa leaves stir-fry Mangalorean Style)

Did you know that the leaves of the drumstick tree are edible and are loaded with nutrients? Drumstick leaves are a common green leafy vegetable in most Indian homes especially down South.  It is known as Murungai in Tamil, Nuggekai soppu in Kannada, Muringa in Malayalam. Long known for it’s medicinal and nutritional properties in Ayurveda, it has of late been in the news in the West and is heralded as a miracle tree. Researches believe that the leaves can help in lowering blood sugars among diabetics, reducing cholesterol and also help in reducing inflammations, joint pain, constipation and cancers among others. Drumstick leaves are rich in calcium, potassium, Vitamin A &C and fiber. Drumstick leaves are sold in health stores in the form of powders and capsules.

I however love it as a stir-fry and make it whenever I find the leaves in the Indian store.

Here is a simple Mangalorean style stir-fry (upkari)made with drumstick leaves:

Ingredients for Drumstick leaves upkari:

  • Drumstick leaves: 1 big bunch (wash and separate the tiny leaves from the stalks)
  • Onion: 1 medium
  • Green chilies: 1-2 (as per your tolerance)
  • Coconut gratings: 2tbsp (fresh/frozen/dessicated)
  • Turmeric: 1/2 tsp (optional)
  • Mustard seeds: 1tsp
  • Urad dal: 1/2 tsp
  • Cumin seeds: 1tsp
  • Oil: 3 tsp
  • Salt: to taste

Method:

  1. Chop the washed leaves as fine as possible.
  2. Finely chop the onions and slit the green chilies.
  3. Heat a kadai, add the oil, then the mustard, cumin seeds and urad dal.
  4. When the mustard seeds start to pop, add the slit green chilies, turmeric powder (optional)then the chopped onions.
  5. Fry till the onions turn translucent. Then add the drumstick leaves and stir for a couple of minutes.
  6. Add some salt and mix well. Then add some water and let the leaves cook, stirring occasionally.
  7. Once the leaves are cooked, add the grated coconut, mix well and switch off.
  8. Since it’s a dry sabzi, it goes better with rice and a curry.

 

 

 


Mangalorean Egg Curry (Eggs in spicy Coconut gravy)

The Mangalorean Egg Curry is one of the dishes that usually features on my menu whenever I invite eggetarians (ovo-vegetarians) for dinner! It’s quick, simple (since I use coconut milk from a can) and a ‘sure to be a hit’ dish !! I always poach the eggs in the gravy-since I feel that it adds to the taste. But if you don’t like the look-you could boil the egg and then put them into the gravy!

Mangalorean Egg Curry

Ingredients for Mangalore Egg Curry (serves 4-6):
  • Eggs: 6 nos.
  • Potato: 1 medium boiled and diced
  • Onion: 1 big (finely sliced)
  • Tomato: 1 medium (diced)
  • Coconut milk: 1 can (I use the thick one not the ‘lite’)
  • Red chilli powder: 4-6 tsp (depending on our spice tolerance)
  • Coriander powder: 4 tsp
  • Cumin powder: 1/4 tsp
  • Turmeric powder: 1/2 tsp
  • Salt: to taste
  • Oil: 1tsp

Tempering:

  • Mustard seeds: 1/2 tsp
  • Cumin seeds/ jeera: 1/2 tsp

Method: 

  1. Heat the oil in a kadai, add the mustard and cumin seeds. When they crackle, add the turmeric and sliced onions.
  2. Add the salt and fry the onions till they are translucent, then add the diced tomatoes and let it cook.
  3. Add the red chilli powder, coriander and cumin powder, potatoes and mix well.
  4. Add the coconut milk and about a cup of water and simmer. Taste the gravy and then reduce the flame.
  5. Carefully break the eggs and drop the contents into the gravy one by one (leaving a little space between each). Cover and cook on a low flame for 6-8 minutes (DO NOT STIR).
  6. Once the eggs are cooked switch off.
  7. Serve the mutta curry (Mangalore Egg Curry) with rice and a side dish.

Note:

For those in a hurry and who don’t have time to make a separate vegetable side dish, you can add different mixed vegetables (add it after frying the onions) like french beans, peas, carrots, cauliflower, etc to this dish itself.

The mutta curry also goes well with phulkas/chapathies.


Mangalore Cucumber and Moong Sprouts Gassi (curry)-Mangalorean Style

Another favorite Mangalorean dish-the sprouted moong/mung and Mangalore cucumber ghassi. Gassi is the Mangalorean term for ‘curry’ or gravy. The Mangalore cucumber is also called the ‘Malabar Cucumber’ is a commonly seen vegetable in South India.

Mangalore cucumber Gassi
Ingredients for Mangalore Cucumber and Moong Sprouts Gassi : 

  • Mangalore Cucumber: 1 medium size
  • Moong Sprouts:200gms
  • Tomato: 1 big or 2 small (chopped)
  • Coconut: 1/2 or 1 cup grated
  • Red chilli powder: 4-5tsp(add more/less according to your tolerance level)
  • Coriander powder: 3tsp
  • Cumin powder: 1/2tsp
  • Salt: to taste

Tempering:

  • Mustard seeds: 1 tsp
  • Cumin /Jeera seeds: 1tsp
  • Turmeric:1/4th tsp
  • Urad dal: 1/2 tsp
  • Curry leaves: 8-10nos.
  • Garlic: 2-3 crushed

Method:

  1. Wash and cut the Mangalore cucumber into half-scoop out the seeds from the centre(check if it’s bitter, if bitter than make sure you scrape out all the seeds and fibre around it).
  2. Cut them into 1″ cubes. Take a saucepan and cook them along with the sprouts with enough water and a little salt.Cover and cook till the Mangalore cucumber almost turns translucent (or is almost cooked),then add the chopped tomatoes and cook till the tomatoes are soft.
  3. In the meanwhile, grind the coconut with the red chilli powder, coriander and cumin/jeera powder to a fine paste.
  4. Add the coconut paste to the saucepan, mix well, test for salt and cook for about 6-8mins.
  5. Switch off.
  6. Take a smaller saucepan/tempering pan and heat the oil, add the mustard,jeera and urad dal. When the mustard starts to sputter, add the turmeric, curry leaves and then the crushed garlic.
  7. Add the tempering to the ghassi. Close the saucepan immediately.
  8. Serve the Mangalore Cucumber and Moong sprouts ghassi with rice and a side dish/chutney.

Kala Channa Rasam ( Brown Chickpea rasam)

Kala channa/ kadale rasam doesn’t actually have any kala channa but is made from the water left over from boiling the kala channa/ brown kadle. When using the channa for a dry sabzi like Manoli kadle or usali, instead of throwing the water, you can make another dish out of it. Moreover, making dal/sambar as the gravy dish will make the meal too heavy with too much protein. The kala channa/ kadle rasam then becomes the perfect side dish for the meal.
Ingredients for Kadale rasam:
  • Kala channa/kadle water: left over water after pressure cooking
  • Tomatoes:2-3 (pureed)
  • Garlic: 3-4 (skinned and smashed)
  • Rasam powder:2- 3tsp (according to taste)
  • Turmeric: 1/4tsp
  • Green chillies:1-2 slit in half
  • Cilantro/coriander leaves- finely chopped
  • Salt: to taste

Tempering:

  •  Mustard seeds: 1tsp
  • Cumin/jeers seeds: 1tsp
  • Urad dal: 1/2 tsp
  • Curry leaves: 8-10
  • Hing/asafoetida:a pinch
  • Oil: 1tsp

Method:

  1. Heat the oil in a pan, then add the mustard seeds,cumin and urad dal.
  2. When the mustard seeds start to pop, add the hing, curry leaves, turmeric and the slit green chillies and smashed garlic and stir for a few seconds.
  3. Add the tomato puree, the rasam powder and salt and stir or 5-6 minutes.
  4. Add the kala channa water , salt and mix well.
  5. Let it boil, then let it simmer for 5-6 minutes.
  6. Garnish with chopped cilantro.
  7. Serve the kala channa/ kadle rasam with rice and the

Click here for the Kadale Manoli recipe


Kadale Manoli (Tendli/Kovakkai with brown channa)

Another favorite Mangalorean recipe is the Manoli Kadle-made with Ivy Gourd(tondekai) called ‘Manoli’ in Tulu (one of the languages spoken in Mangalore) ‘tondli‘ in Marathi, ‘tendli‘ in Konkani ‘tindora‘ in Hindi and ‘kovakkai’ in Tamil. ‘Kadle’ is the brown channa/kala channa (brown garbanzo beans) that is traditionally used but you could substitute it with kabuli channa (chickpeas/garbanzo beans) if you don’t have the brown variety.
Ingredients for Kadale Manoli:(serves 4)

  • Brown/kala channa:3/4th cup soaked overnight and pressure cooked till soft (Don’t throw away the extra water after pressure cooking-it is used for making kala channa rasam)
  • Tondli-250gms(cut into long strips or thin rings)
  • Grated coconut-2 tbsp.
  • Red chilly powder-2-3 tsp( or according to your spice tolerance)
  • Coriander powder: 1 tsp
  • Turmeric: 1/2 tsp
  • Garlic: 2 big/ 4-5 small(peeled and smashed just before adding to tadka/tempering)
  • Tamarind paste-1/4tsp
  • Mustard seeds: 1tsp
  • Urad dal: 1tsp
  • Curry leaves-10
  • Hing/Asafoetida -a pinch
  • Dry red chillies: 1-2(broken into half)
  • Salt: to taste
  • Oil: 2 tsp

Method:

  1. Heat the oil is a non-stick pan, add the mustard seeds, urad dal and let the mustard pop.
  2. Add the broken dry chillies, curry leaves and then the smashed garlic. Saute till the garlic gets a slight brown color.
  3. Add the turmeric, hing and the chopped tondli and fry for 5 minutes.
  4. Add the cooked channa, red chilli powder, coriander powder, salt and about 1/2-1 cup water.
  5. Cover and cook till the tondli is soft,then add the tamarind paste. Mix and let the water evaporate.
  6. Add the grated coconut and mix.
  7. Serve the manoli kadle with hot rasam (recipe in my next post) and rice.

Note:
1)You can also use the dry dessicated (unsweetened) coconut available at grocery stores. Rehydrate it by adding it to hot water for 5 minutes. Strain and then add.
2) Use extra water when you pressure cook the kala channa-then drain the water and you can make rasam with it.
The manoli kadle, and the kala channa rasam combo goes together and is eaten with rice.

Click here for the Kala Channa Rasam Recipe

Kadale Manoli and kala channa rasam

Kadale Manoli and kala channa rasam